Wilson Hand Dies



  • I learned something new today. Killing time on the computer I came across a thread on another forum talking about these.

    http://www.sinclairintl.com/reloading-equipment/reloading-dies/rifle-dies/wilson-seater-die-prod36168.aspx?avs|Cartridge_1=CTT_308+Winchester&avs|Manufacturer_1=l.e.+wilson%2C+inc.
    I'm not looking for mobile loading, but I was wondering are these way more accurate than a normal RCBS die? For $50 the die isn't expensive.



  • Wilson Seaters and an arbor press are generally going to be a LOT more precise than a standard RCBS seater in a regular press.

    Some good forster or whidden dies in a forster co-ax press will give them a run for their money however.



  • So would one also want to upgrade to the Wilson neck die as well? Or is the standard FL size die and press going to work?

    Not looking to upgrade or change at the moment, just educating myself.



  • Wilson dies are known for inexpensively producing very straight ammo. I would most certainly rate their stuff higher than RCBS. RCBS is right there with Lee in terms of quality. They are pretty low end.

    However, using wilson dies leave a bit to be desired from an operational standpoint if you are a volume shooter. It's kind of laborious and certainly not fast. Here's an overview of the process. http://www.sinclairintl.com/GunTech/Wilson-Hand-Dies-Accurate-Fast-and-Fun-/detail.htm?lid=16050



  • I use a Wilson seater and it does not slow down my process...but I only have one Chargemaster. I can keep up with that Chargemaster. If you have two chargemasters you will probably want a standard seater die.

    I have also used the Wilson neck dies. They are good quality, but I have brass that has been fired 4 times that is already starting to develop a "donut" that will need to be turned out if I continue using the brass. I have since changed over to a whidden custom fl sizer and continue to use my Wilson and k&m arbor press for seating.

    If you want to save money then get the version without a micro top. The micro top saves time when working up a seating depth, but once you find the proper seating depth you can just lock it down and you won't use the micro top.



  • While a Wilson die is cheap enough to try it out you also need the arbor press. Does the Forster controlled seating die still work as good in a traditional press? Meaning without the float that the Forster press has.



  • I'm not familiar with a forster "controlled" seating die. Is it something new they have?



  • If you just want to try them out a small mallet works too...but if you get much volume you will want a press.



  • @orkan said:

    I'm not familiar with a forster "controlled" seating die. Is it something new they have?

    I used the wrong term.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/395095/forster-ultra-micrometer-seater-die-308-winchester



  • @dddoo7 said:

    If you just want to try them out a small mallet works too...but if you get much volume you will want a press.

    Thats not a bad thought. I do 100 rounds of .308 at a time, so it wouldn't be horrible.



  • @norcal_in_az said:

    @orkan said:

    I'm not familiar with a forster "controlled" seating die. Is it something new they have?

    I used the wrong term.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/395095/forster-ultra-micrometer-seater-die-308-winchester

    Yes, those dies are still the go-to budget die regardless of press... however being in the forster press ensures lower runout by floating the die.



  • I saw this thread and even though it's a year old I have something that might help. I use Wilson chamber type seat dies for several calibers, especially for seating light bullets that are hard to hold in a conventional die set up like RCBS. I just use the drill press. I have a cheap harbor freight arbor press but it's a pain so I put a bolt in the drill chuck and adjust the table up to where it feels good and press them in with the quill. I clamp a piece of plywood with a hole bored in it the size of the die base on the table centered of the chuck and get after it. I get a little flex in my press so I have to clamp a brace from the base to the table to stiffen it up but that's it. Not a speed demon but they sure go in straight. I use a Wilson trimmer also, good piece of equipment.


Log in to reply