Prepping LC Brass



  • So I have a few hundred LC .223 cases that I need to prep. I hate prepping those smaller cases. I'm pretty sure I'm going to get the Frankford Arsenal Case Prep center. I've read enough reviews of it to know I'm going to buy the RCBS cutting head when I buy the machine. (Unless my Lyman ones I have now work)

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/36128113?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&adid=22222222227024132778&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=43266148232&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=81189004592&veh=sem

    My main question is, for removing the crimp, the cutter style heads are fine are they not? I use one by hand now, so being able to do it on the machine should be great. With this I should be able to knock out a case in 15 seconds or so.



  • I use the Hornady primer pocket reamer and a tool adapter to cut the crimps. That Case prep center looks pretty neat, does it trim the case as well as all the other steps?



  • @mamalukino said:

    I use the Hornady primer pocket reamer and a tool adapter to cut the crimps. That Case prep center looks pretty neat, does it trim the case as well as all the other steps?

    Yes sir.



  • The thing I considered when I was shopping for a prep center was that it would be able to get a consistent angle for a flat chamfer and deburr with the machine being on an angled stand as it is. Haven't tried it personally so your mileage may vary.

    Ultimately I went with the Lyman Case prep center so I could push the cases straight down.
    I don't mind trimming on a different station.

    The cutter that came with mine makes short work of the crimp. Getting the RCBS cutter is a good idea though now that I consider it, the design of the RCBS seems better.



  • I just watched videos on the prep center and that RCBS primer pocket trimmer. Looks like some good stuff.
    Thanks for bringing this to our attention.:smile:



  • The thing about crimped primer pockets is that cutters remove material. crimped primer pockets really don't need material removed...they need it pushed back to where it should have been to start with. The only thing that really does that well is a swager. On the economy side...the dillon 600 runs about $100 and does a very good job of swaging primer pockets. It is on the slow side though.

    I process AR brass on a dillon 1050. It will decap, swage, size, and trim all in one pass...and still has an open station if you want to run a ball through the neck one more time (which I do). I can prep about 1500/hr like that. Once rough trim is done...the 1050 will convert to blackout just as fast. I am currently getting $0.07 each to prep .223/5.56 brass. This includes annealing and stainless tumbling. If someone would want to take care of the tumbling and could live without annealing I would run them through the press for $0.04 each. That might be cheaper and easier than buying the tools depending on how many 1,000's you plan to do in the next few years.


 

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