Choosing a bipod



  • Now that you have the rifle of your dreams, what is your criteria for choosing a particular brand/type bipod? My shooting is limited to square ranges and I shoot prone 99.9% of the time.
    My current favorite is the Sinclair Varmint Tactical, it gives me the weight and wide stances and various height I like for prone shooting. The canting is adjustable and locks in solidly.
    The legs have 3 positions of horizontal spread from a fairly narrow to an extra wide stance; used in conjunction with the canting it gives me what I need for the type of shooting I do.

    I know there are more choices out there and I own a few of them like the Harris and the Atlas, but for me the Sinclair fits the bill.

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    0


  • Choosing a bipod to fit the specific application is not a terrible thing. Obviously F-class bipods are huge and goofy, but they work great for that sport. Not so much in a field situation.

    I require that a bipod work for me, not against me. I very much like the atlas PSR. It flexes a bit, allowing good loading. The rubber feet grip any surface I put it on and provide a soft contact point to ensure there is no hard-to-hard contact between my rifle and the world. This keeps the harmonics in check. It's adjustable tension ensures I can manipulate the rifle from the firing position to level up without violating NPA. Lastly, the versatility in how you can position the legs is without equal.

    Were I only able to have one bipod, it would be an atlas PSR.



  • Because I can't afford an Atlas at the moment, I plan on upgrading my Harris. I'm going to get the Khantrol feet conversions and Atlas feet. This will also give me another inch of height to my 6"-9" plus I can then get all the cool Atlas feet and extensions later on.



  • Nice. I wasn't aware they offered a conversion that will let you have atlas feet on a harris! That's mega cool.

    The hard harris feet are quite unforgiving.



  • @norcal_in_az said:

    Because I can't afford an Atlas at the moment, I plan on upgrading my Harris. I'm going to get the Khantor feet conversions and Atlas feet. This will also give me another inch of height to my 6"-9" plus I can then get all the cool Atlas feet and extensions later on.

    Can you give a link so we can check them out?

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    0




  • @rhyno said:

    Maybe this?
    https://kahntrol.com/podmodadapters/

    Yup those are it.



  • @norcal_in_az @Ryhno

    Pretty neat.

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    0


  • Harris swivel bipod - $120
    Adapters - $30
    Atlas feet - $20
    = $170

    Atlas PSR w/ADM
    = $320

    Definitely a significant savings there, and it looks like it resolves a very big problem I see with the Harris bipods when it comes to chasing ultimate accuracy. While I still think the Atlas PSR is the ultimate bipod for a precision rifle right now, I think there's a utility in this product for sure.



  • Yup very nice saving. Don't get me wrong, the Atlas is the best bi-pod out there, but for $50 to fix a major issue on the Harris is well worth it. Now that my brake is done, this is next on my list.



  • Just ordered the Khantrol conversions and Atlas feet. I'll update y'all when I get em and install them.



  • I'm interested in how they work out for you.
    :smiley: That should be a great combo.

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

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  • Banned

    Never had an issue with a standard Harris BRM-S with only adding a Pod Loc. They are on all my match rifles.



  • @rob01 said:

    Never had an issue with a standard Harris BRM-S with only adding a Pod Loc. They are on all my match rifles.

    I'm looking forward to the softer rubber, plus the option of simply snapping in leg extensions.



  • I too am interested to hear how the Khantrol conversions work out for you. It definitely can't hurt a Harris to have those squishy Atlas feet.

    One of the biggest things I did for the consistency of my shooting was to switch to an Atlas from a Harris. Going to the Atlas eliminated a POI shift that I thought was coming from crappy scope/mounts/hardware setup. What I was actually experiencing was the unforgiveness of the Harris bipod in various medias.

    The hard contact that comes with a Harris is GOING to have more effect on the rifles recoil impulse and direction than that of the softer more forgiving Atlas.

    Case in point - if you've ever been to a PRS shoot or other tactical rifle competition you'll notice that almost every single rifle has some sort of pad wrapping around the forearm of the rifl; and if they dont, that competitor is most likely carrying around a soft bag that he will slip over the forearm of the rifle to sandwich between a barricade to eliminate the hard contact between his stock/chassis and the barricade. It's not voodoo stuff or a high speed, low drag fad; but simply physics.

    While purchasing a $320 Atlas bipod might not make you a 1/4moa shooter overnight, it WILL make those little tiny groups and impacts come a lot easier!



  • I couldn't have said it better Travis. The Atlas is simply setup better to allow a much more forgiving interface with the planet than Harris. I've had several students struggle with proper form on a harris even on flat carpet in the classroom. When an Atlas is introduced, they find the entire act of driving the rifle properly much easier.

    Like Travis, I too spent a lot of time on a Harris wondering why my POI was shifting 1/4" here, 1/4" there. The hard to hard contact most certainly can be assigned some of that blame. Also, the issue isn't how it behaves on one media, but how it behaves on all of them... and the fact that the atlas is simply more forgiving in more situations than the harris.


  • Banned

    Never had a POI shift issue with a Harris but I will be watching to see how people report on the feet. I like to upgrade when needed and it will show me an improvement of some sort. Not an Atlas fan but if I can get a small using similar feet on my Harris it wouldn't be a bad thing,



  • @rob01 Could you expound on why you're not an Atlas fan? I am curious if you've witnessed something I've been missing or not yet run into in using my Atlas bipods.

    I ask in the interest of maintaining the integrity of the content on this forum and furthering my knowledge base.

    "Gunhive values first hand experience above all.""We encourage everyone to voice their opinions on equipment and techniques that they have experienced first hand."
    https://forums.gunhive.com/topic/78/code-of-conduct


  • Banned

    They are expensive for what you get as lets face it the only reason for the bipod is to hold the rifle off the ground at a certain height. Not a super technical thing. They are slow to deploy as you have to grab each leg to open them up. You can't just have a piece of 550 cord between the two legs and yank it down like the Harris. Also slow to put them up if needed. Harris is just faster. I have never had any issues in shooting positions with the Harris and I have been shooting tactical long range matches, currently known as PRS matches, for 13 years with a Harris. I have no problem switching to different gear or spending money on gear but I don't see the return in investment with the Atlas over the Harris. I know people who have tried the Atlas and went back to the Harris. Might be a perfectly machined piece of equipment and well put together but it's just not for everyone. Nothing is.



  • I am quick to agree that the Harris bipod is FAR faster to deploy than an Atlas. I've also used the 550 cord trick on Harris bipods while hunting or in 3-gun competitions. The Harris gets my vote there. At one time, I would have also agreed that the type of bipod I used was of little more importance than holding my rifle off the ground at a certain height.

    However, after sending thousands of rounds off the top of both Harris and Atlas bipods, attending Greg's precision rifle classes, competing in PRS shoots, conversing with accomplished shooters, and hours of researching what truly makes shooters and rifles more accurate and conistent; I can say with certainty that bipod selection is a technical subject. These are the reasons and experience that have led me to my recommendation of the Atlas bipod and why I will continue to use it.

    I'll use the benchrest discipline as an example. Speedy Gonzalez is likely the most accomplished short range benchrest shooter there has been and in his article from accurateshooter.com "Cure for Vertical Stringing" http://www.accurateshooter.com/shooting-skills/cures-for-vertical-stringing/ he states "A front sandbag that is too hard can induce vertical. Personally, I’ve have never had a rifle that will shoot consistently with a rock-hard front sandbag. It always causes vertical or other unexplained shots."
    I would argue that this is true with a tactical/field rifle and its bipod as well. Hence, my affinity to a softer contact bipod such as an Atlas WHEN ACCURACY AND CONISISTENCY ARE OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE.

    Again, I'm not disputing the fact that the Harris is undoubtedly faster than an Atlas to deploy and use. If speed is the most important feature in your bipod, then proceed accordingly. Had your only statements been something like "I like Harris bipods over the Atlas/Sinclair/etc. because they are fast to deploy", I think all here would find that completely acceptable. However, the OP started a discussion about the criteria that you use for choosing a particular brand/type of bipod and responding with "lets face it the only reason for the bipod is to hold the rifle off the ground at a certain height. Not a super technical thing." is far from adding useful information to the conversation. According to the GunHive Code of Conduct, GunHive will not tolerate such behavior as it is not based on proven truths and adds nothing to substance of the discussion. I for one, would like to see it kept that way.

    I encourage other users of this forum to be vigilant in the effort of maintaining the integrity of the content here. Unlike other sites, you will not be attacked for stating your opinions when backed with first hand experience. I will admit to not being an active forum user on other sites solely due to the amount of BS and non-factual, opinionated, garbage that is spewed within. GunHive is a breath of fresh air and I will not hesitate to participate with my experiences knowing that I will not be attacked for no reason or because someone doesn't agree with what I've seen first hand.


  • Banned

    I was adding my personal experience in shooting precision rifles for 23 years, teaching precision rifle classes for the past 5 years and being a top competitor in the sport of long range tactical matches. Sorry if the holding the rifle off the ground comment bothered you but it's the truth. People shoot off all sorts of things from packs to stumps to other people. I have done all those and more. Was giving him my thoughts on the matter.



  • Unfortunately, I have to press this subject further. Again, you have provided ZERO proof as to why the only purpose of the bipod is to hold the rifle above the ground and is not a super technical subject. My feelings are not hurt from that comment, I'm simply standing up for the integrity of the conversation. I did so with examples from first hand experiences and backed that up with documentation from an indisputable leader and authority on rifle accuracy.
    You are correct, people shoot off of all sorts of things; but that isn't what the OP asked about.
    GunHive isn't a place to express your thoughts on a matter without real, hard evidence; of which you have provided none. Claiming your 23 years of shooting precision rifles, 5 years of teaching, and being a top level competitor is simply not proof to how it could be true that the only purpose of the bipod is to hold the rifle off the ground. That is as empty of a reason as your blanket statement to the purpose of a bipod.
    Spouting untruths and blindly defending them with hollow statements is not what GunHive is about, read the Code of Conduct - https://forums.gunhive.com/topic/78/code-of-conduct


  • Banned

    Good luck with your site. Good bye.


  • Banned

    @tscustoms said:

    However, after sending thousands of rounds off the top of both Harris and Atlas bipods, attending Greg's precision rifle classes, competing in PRS shoots, conversing with accomplished shooters, and hours of researching what truly makes shooters and rifles more accurate and conistent; I can say with certainty that bipod selection is a technical subject. These are the reasons and experience that have led me to my recommendation of the Atlas bipod and why I will continue to use it.

    Guess your shooting, talking to people and taking classes is proof but mine isn't?



  • @tscustoms:

    I use an Atlas myself, but this says something.

    B4A393A6-5B3F-48EE-9516-C51D6E973830_zpsijxsz7n2.png



  • Pizfiz, you are correct, it does say something: How many shooters were reported to be shooting each bipod. It is a valid datapoint, and I thank you for sharing it. It is important to remember however that competitors shoot what they shoot for a variety of reasons, and statistical data without context, can often be used to support nearly any conclusion. Much of the statistics on PRB are used by both sides of an argument to support their position, when in actuality, neither should. Their work with brakes however, was extremely enlightening and one can draw many conclusions from it. Context and perspective is everything however. Without those two things, pure numbers can be used to support any conclusion. If those numbers showed most using an atlas, I would still maintain that belief. The only true data point in the graph, is how many reportedly used what. That is the only concrete conclusion that can be drawn there. Not what is better or worse. If you polled and asked how many use Tangent Theta optics compared to vortex, no doubt more use vortex. Would that mean the vortex is the better optic? Of course it wouldn't. See what I mean there? Data needs context to have value.

    Regarding the bipod discussion, Travis has demonstrated exactly how discussions should take place on Gunhive. Provide a view point, cite specific first hand examples, provide third party sources that back those up if available, and competently explain his viewpoints. Rob has failed to do that, and is now showing himself the door, but not really, since he's back moments later trying to undermine Travis's arguments without providing any real facts yet.

    Travis's position is simple: Harris is faster than the Atlas, just as Rob said. The Atlas provides a much more forgiving shooting platform and allows for more precisely placed shots.

    That is a position that I agree with 100%, for reasons supported by the very evidence Travis provided. Tactical rifle shooters sometimes mistakenly think they are the originators of precision rifle accuracy. Off a bipod, a ruck, a barricade, this is often true. However, pure rifle accuracy has always been the realm of benchresters. The sources Travis cites are some of the most accomplished in existence. If someone is going to question that, they had better be prepared to show their work. Rob is clearly not, and he wants to just say "this is the way it is" and provide no data, references, or supporting materials to quantify his claims that the Atlas does not allow for an easier time making more precise shots than the Harris.

    Those are the facts, and Travis is clearly open to someone challenging those facts if they are prepared to show their work. So am I. Rob wants to claim that he is a "top level" shooter and try to trap Travis into battling it out. Travis isn't interested. Neither am I. If you cannot explain your claims simply enough to type here for all to read and absorb, you don't understand them well enough. Simple as that. However, if a concept boils down to a battle of personalities, that too has a solution.

    Lets have a look at the two shooters shall we?

    Travis placed 6th in the Snipershide cup last year. An event with almost 250 of the saltiest and most experienced competitors in the nation. Travis has only been competing seriously for a year and a half or so, yet can already finish in the top 10 at the largest PRS shoot there is. That says something. That's data with context. He can be seen on video, (sometimes with me) shooting coyotes in field conditions with small caliber rifles out past 500yds relatively routinely. He is one of the most talented gunsmiths I know, producing the most accurate barrels/rifles I've ever shot. (... and I've shot a LOT) He shoots, and works on shooting related things every single day, and is a riflesmith by definition.

    Now lets have a look at Rob. It doesn't appear that he's competed in a PRS event for for nearly 4 years. Kind of odd for someone claiming themselves a "top level competitor" I think. I'm a great shooter, but I don't consider myself a top level competitor. Back between 2010 and 2013'ish... I won every long range match I ever attended. Yet the landscape has changed quite a lot in that time folks. The competitors are far more seasoned than they were back then, in every way possible. If I went to a PRS event now, I'm certain I'd have a rough go of it. Much more so than back then. So if Rob is claiming to be a "top level competitor," we'll need to see some evidence of that fact before taking it to the bank. What competitions? Where are the score cards published? Not matches from 4 years ago, but 2015. What does Rob do for a living?

    This thread has been a great example of the different kind of tone that will be set on Gunhive. This is not a place for people to come share their "opinions." This is a place for people to share their "experiences." There is a massive difference. On point, if someone is going to disagree with Travis's (and my) position that the Atlas allows for more forgiving support which allows you to keep NPA easier, allowing you to place shots better... then they need to provide proof of that testing and experience which says so. Just saying "harris is just as good" isn't going to make the cut here.

    Travis and Rob are both easy to talk to in person. However as you can see in this situation, one completely understands the goals of discussion on Gunhive... the other does not. ... and if the "other" takes one more shot at Travis because he is unable to adequately quantify his own opinions with facts, he'll be shown the door if he keeps having trouble finding it on his own.


  • Banned

    Don't worry Greg. I can find my way out. This site is just a sale site for you and a couple others anyways. Will slow down more than it is once people see this. So have fun trying to attack my past record although it can stand on it's own. Yes I haven't shot many long range matches due to my own choice but the scene hasn't changed as much as you think and it doesn't change what I have accomplished in the past or my knowledge of the sport. So save you long winded BS speeches. Have a good time on the site while it lasts.

    Anyone wondering what I have done:
    2003 - ASC #2 - 10th place
    2003 - Carlos Hathcock 9th Annual match - 13th place (Marines)
    2004 - Snipers Hide Cup - 10th place
    2004 - Carlos Hathcock 10th Annual match - 1st place (Marines)
    2004 - Storm Mountain Sniper Match Team Event - 12th place
    2005- Snipers Hide Cup - 17th place
    2005 - ASC# 4 - 2nd place
    2005 - ASC#4.5 (fall match) - 2nd place
    2006 - Snipers Hide Cup - 6th place
    2006 - Snipers Hide Bash - 11th place
    2006 - ASC#5 - 2nd place
    2006 - ASC#5.5(fall match) - 4th place
    2006 - Carlos Hathcock 12th Annual match - 1st place (Marines)
    2007 - Snipers Hide Cup - 4th place
    2007 - ASC (spring match) - 4th place
    2007 - Tac Pro Sniper Match - 1st place
    2007 - Reade Range PA Sniper Match (Fall) - 1st place
    2007 - Carlos Hathcock 13th Annual Match - 1st place "A" (Marines)
    2007 - Carlos Hathcock 13th Annual Match - 1st place Team
    2007 - Sniper's Hide Bash - 4th place
    2008 - Sniper's Hide Cup - 13th Place
    2008 - Reade Range PA Sniper Match (Spring) - 1st place
    2008 - Idaho State Sniper Challenge - 8th place - Team
    2008 - Idaho State Sniper Challenge - 6th place Individual
    2008 - Reade Range PA Sniper Match (Fall) - 1st place
    2008 - NORCAL Sniper Competition - 2nd place
    2008 - Sniper's Hide Bash - 9th place
    2009 - Tactics Precision Rifle Challenge - 1st place
    2009 - Reade Range PA Sniper Match (Spring) - 1st place
    2009 - Reade Range PA Sniper Match (Summer) - 1st place
    2009 - Carlos Hathcock 15th Annual Match - 1st place (Marine)
    2010 - AZ TPRC - 15th place
    2010 - Sniper's Hide Cup - 6th place
    2010 - Reade Range PA Sniper Match (Spring) - 10th place
    2010 - NorCal Bolt Rifle Challenge - 11th place
    2010 - BHTC/MCSA Team Precision Match - 1st place Team
    2011 - AZ TPRC - 5th place
    2011 - Sniper's Hide Cup - 4th place
    2011 - Score High Tactical Rifle Challenge - 9th place
    2011 - Oregon Sniper Championship - 6th place
    2011 - BHTC/MCSA Precision Match - 2nd Place
    2011 - BHT Precision Match - 2nd Place
    2012 - Missouri Midwest Rifle Masters - 3rd Place
    2012 - Rifles Only Bushnell Brawl - 4th Place
    2012 - Score High Tactical Rifle Challenge - 6th Place
    2012 - Sniper's Hide Cup - 6th place
    2014 - BHTC Sniper Challenge - 2nd place



  • ... and yet you still can't focus on the topic at hand. You want to attack people. You want to attack this site. You don't want to discuss the facts about a specific category of products.

    You haven't even shot a match, save one, since the Atlas PSR bipod came out. Heck, the atlas design was just barely getting finalized in 2012, your last real competition experience it looks like. Yet you think you are qualified to dispute Travis regarding the differences of a Harris and an Atlas in a match? There it is, the exact anti-thesis of Gunhive. You have not even used the thing we're discussing here in a match, yet want to claim that the "other thing" is better in matches. Your record of the past is exactly that: Past. Not very recent past, I might add. This sport changes at light speed every single year. Your opinions are not current. Your match performances are not current. If you had discussed the facts at hand with Travis instead of trying to blanket him with things unrelated, your experience wouldn't have been called into question. Yet now that it has, we can clearly see the time between 2012 and 2016... and that is not in keeping with someone that talks of "matches" as much as you do.

    Then, if that is not bad enough, you want to make claims about what this site is or isn't? As if attacking me, Travis, or this website will somehow alleviate the fact that you lack the experience and perspective with the products in question here to make an objective recommendation. Seems that making unqualified statements is just "your thing." Gunhive is the first of its kind, in many ways. This conflict you are having with Travis, is just one of the ways it's different. So unless you can approach this discussion having demonstrated experience with the Atlas and be able to directly provide proof that refutes what Travis is saying, keep yourself elsewhere.

    ^ That is Gunhive.

    Not who you used to be. Not who you "think" you are.

    Who you actually ARE.



  • 25300719871_7de0ca6ab7_b.jpg

    Got the Khontrol Pod Mod's with Atlas feet today. Install wasn't bad, just had to get the legs locked down so I could tap out the old roll pin. The extra height was much needed to make up for my big gut, and just trying the new feet out on my carpet I can tell they grab 1 million times better than the Harris. Looking forward to trying these out to see if the hop is gone.



  • Looking good :thumbsup:
    Get out and shoot that bugga. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    1


  • Excellent. Keep us posted!

    Just a point of clarity - Bipod hop is not caused by the bipod, but the shooter. With proper position behind the rifle in any firing position, using any support, the rifle will recoil straight back. The difference between the harris and the atlas is that the atlas will allow you to get away with more poor form than the harris without exhibiting the ill effects. "Bipod hop" is just one of those effects. I have no doubt that the squishy feet you just added will help you get your firing position correct a lot easier than before.

    I've contemplated adding some squishy rubber stoppers to the forward lock wall of the harris a few times to give some forgiveness there as well. Since most of my rifles have an Atlas on there, I just haven't got around to trying something out. ;)



  • @orkan The only time I have bi-pod hop is on those hard concrete benches. It feels like even when you do everything right, those Harris feet just jump around.



  • @norcal_in_az said:

    @orkan The only time I have bi-pod hop is on those hard concrete benches. It feels like even when you do everything right, those Harris feet just jump around.

    That is caused by the rigidity in the bipod. Violent explosion and vibration during firing which is not being absorbed anywhere and being transferred directly into the hard concrete. These new feet you have will help. An Atlas would help more. ;)



  • I used Harris bipods for a looooooong time. They work very well. I would suggest getting the "S" models that pan side to side. Esp for field or match use when you do not have time to adj one leg at a time to level the rifle. I also preferred the "leg notch" models. I found it much quicker to just push the button and pull the leg out one notch at a time on very uneven surface vs loosening the clamp tension screw and trying to pull the leg out. I still use the 25C model for some sitting positions while hunting, altho at 27" extended it is still a lot short for a sitting position from a seat or bucket and you will need a short stool. It is not comfortable to sit with your knees above your hips for a long time.

    A few years ago I switched over to Atlas V8 models. Just the leg angle positioning was worth it to me. The side to side pan and left to right was very nice also. The leg height adjustment is far easier than the Harris. One hand only, up or down. It seems the Harris has to be a two handed adjustment sometimes. The ADM lever is far easier to use and does not loosen like the Harris stud mount can sometimes do. The ONLY thing I really did not like about the V8 models was the short collapsed length of the legs (4.75") I always had to adj the legs out to aprox the 6" position to shoot comfortably and not feel like the rifle was too low. It is difficult to preload the bipod or get much of a bit on a flat surface since the legs and feet rotate. I had the claw feet on one and they always seemed to be canted to much and would not sit flat on the ground with out messing with them.

    This year I upgraded to the PRS long leg models and am looking forward to using them The long legs will work great for me since they start at 7" and I will not give up any height adj. They also extent to 13". The legs do not rotate like the V8 model and that is a big plus.



  • I did get to try out the new feet and I was very happy with them. I shot them on dirt and off my plastic table. Dirt wasn't a whole different, but on the table I could easily notice a difference in being able pre load the bi-pod.

    I was able to get the Harris feet off without ruining them, so I can always put them back on if I want to.

    One thing though, has anyone every changed out the springs in a harris?



  • I use the "Third Eye Tactical". I've used them all, but this one is by far the best ever.

    http://www.accurateshooter.com/gear-reviews/evo-f-tr-bipod-from-third-eye-tactical/

    with the adjustment wheel I can adjust fractions of an inch at a time.



  • Today I got to shoot my new Atlas PSR Bipod. I shot it on two different rifles and on 2 different surfaces, a painted wood shooting table and shooting mat on concrete. I was impressed to say the least. I have an older model Atlas and the 2 things I didn't care much for were the way the legs would rotate when loading and the way it rocked fore and aft. The rubber feet are the right durometer to hold just about any surface for loading. I love the quick attach/detach mechanism, makes it easy to swap to other rifles.
    X3nOVpN.jpg
    Stay tuned for more as I experience this bipod's excellent features.

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    3


  • Greg can the Atlas BT15 Pic. rail be mounted to a flat surface?
    It has the correct hole spacing but is a relieved base to accommodate curved surfaces. I would prefer the old style but I haven't a clue if they are flat or relieved. If I were to install, would I need to bed it?
    Old model:
    A6nva0O.jpg
    New Model:
    gjHweJU.jpg

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    0


  • I got a rail from my bell and Carlson from someone, I can't remeber who though I'm pretty sure it wasn't B&T



  • @mamalukino said:

    Greg can the Atlas BT15 Pic. rail be mounted to a flat surface?
    It has the correct hole spacing but is a relieved base to accommodate curved surfaces. I would prefer the old style but I haven't a clue if they are flat or relieved. If I were to install, would I need to bed it?
    Old model:
    A6nva0O.jpg
    New Model:
    gjHweJU.jpg

    The new model 3.35" rail has a radius to the bottom. The BT17 4" rail has a flat bottom.



  • What Travis said. :)

    Even if it is radiused, I would think the sides would ride on a flat surface just fine without bedding. I have several rifles with flat bottoms that had a rail stuck on them with a bit of a radius, and it doesn't bother. Just make sure it isn't sharp, so it doesn't "cut" into the stock and you should be good. :)



  • Thanks guys for the info. This is for my .223's stock.
    I have a Seekins on the B&C that works fine and I looked at both the BT15 and 17 ; the 17 would be best choice except for the hole spacing. If I need to drill a new hole I'll get another Seekins, that way there shouldn't be any need to change QR tensions when switching rifles.

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    0


  • I have a BT-17 on my .22. It is a flat bottom stock and works great.

    As far as bipod goes...I used my $100 prize money from last month to go towards a PRS. Up until this point I have had the BT-10 and been happy with it. I refused to look at the PRS because I was afraid I would like it...but with $100 off I had to try it.



  • Update on the rail mount. I went with the BT15 because of the hole spacing..It arrived in today's mail and is currently installed on my .223's stock. It sits flat even with the relieved bottom contour.

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    2


  • Anyone know anything about a change to the Atlas BT-10 bipod?

    I have 2 Atlas BT-10s. One purchased in June of 2013 and another purchased in August of this year. The old one which has served me well for 3 years has more than 5 degrees of slop between the leg and angle locking mechanism. This slop allows the rifle to move forward about a 1/2" inch (depending on the amount the legs are extended) when loading the bipod. The new version has no slop in the locking mechanism and only moves forward very little upon loading.



  • Sounds like one of your bipods is defective.

    Give B&T a call.



  • Bumping this thread vs starting a whole new one.

    I just ordered a new Harris swivel notched leg model bi-pod. I will be putting the Khantrol Solutions Atlas feet adapters on this one as well. My question is when using a bi-pod with the tilt/cant option, do you lock the bi-pod down once its level or shoot with it unlocked?

    Also side bar...who uses anti can't levels and what style do you use? Scope mounted or rail?



  • @norcal_in_az I always snug my tilt adjustment. I do shoot Hawkins Precision rings on everything with a level as well.



  • Thanks for digging this thread up. Was a good laugh. I see rob's prediction from over a year ago that we'd "slow down" here didn't exactly come true as he anticipated. :p

    Regarding bipod swivel in position, I set the atlas to a tightness where I can move it, but it resists movement a bit. The tension can be adjusted very smoothly. With a harris, this is more difficult but can be accomplished. Adjusting, and then breaking firing position to "lock it down" is a poor plan. NPA will almost certainly be violated, and the torque of the rifle will break that position by causing the rifle to pivot on the swivel even if the recoil doesn't cause the feet to dig into the earth and move around on you anyway.

    Regarding levels. I have nothing explicitly against them, but I do believe that when you have turned as much of this over to your instinctual subconscious faculties as possible, your body/mind can level the rifle to gravity's pull better than a level can. This is one of the core reasons I always ensure my optic is mounted squarely (level) to my rifle. Levels can really help in cold weather when its hard to get a solid "feel" of your rifle through bulky clothing, or when shooting weak side where you don't have the repetition required to build instinct.



  • I've never used a level and know canting the rifle isn't good. But I'm wondering if I put a level on am I going to spend more time second guessing myself and position than anything. Don't know if it matters, but 95% of my shooting is prone or on a bench.



  • @norcal_in_az said:

    I've never used a level and know canting the rifle isn't good. But I'm wondering if I put a level on am I going to spend more time second guessing myself and position than anything. Don't know if it matters, but 95% of my shooting is prone or on a bench.

    It's possible. The answer really is up to you. Are you more zen like me, or are you more mechanical? Mechanical types like levels. Zen types like not having them.


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