Mind the seating pressure folks



  • If you aren't already aware of this, you need to pay attention to the seating force required to seat bullets when you're loading up a batch of rounds.

    I just seated 100rnds, and there were 5 of them that were very tight. Virgin brass, and I didn't size them first. Lapua. I kept those 5 separate, as there is a very high likelihood they will hit somewhere they are not suppose to!

    During live fire, sure enough, most certainly hit elsewhere. Normal rounds were the first 5 on left. The hard seating rounds were those on the right. So pay attention and keep them separate!

    yuDEBGt.jpg



  • Funny you posted this, After reading the Concentricity tool thread this a.m. I took a look at the 21st Century web site and saw this:

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    0


  • @mamalukino I was browsing C21 looking at neck turning tools.

    They have some nice looking equipment.



  • +1 for 21st Century Tools - very nice stuff.

    I "feel" sort my loaded rounds as I'm seating bullets as well. Heavier ones to one side and lighter ones to the other. For the most part there is VERY little difference in feel, but it's peace of mind.
    I'll snatch out the real wonky ones and set them aside for sighters/foulers.



  • @tscustoms said:

    I'll snatch out the real wonky ones and set them aside for sighters/foulers.

    That second 5-shot group took about 3x the seating force. Small differences are much less likely to shift POI.



  • +1 on the "feel" while seating. I notice when one seems a little different. I set it aside and it will allways have a poi shift when shot.



  • I'm gonna try this. I'm still working through my virgin brass while waiting for whidden to make my sizing die. I have noticed about 4-5/100 that are harder to seat. Maybe that explains some of my fliers.



  • It's interesting to not that I believe @Orkan anneals every firing as well.



  • @rhyno said:

    It's interesting to not that I believe @Orkan anneals every firing as well.

    I do, but this batch of brass I was working with was virgin. Untouched. If you pay attention to feel when seating, you will always notice some pieces of new virgin brass will seat harder. Remember, the guys that work at these factory's probably are not shooters. It isn't hard to imagine how stray pieces of brass find their way into a batch, throwing off the uniformity.

    I really don't trust brass until I've had a firing on it. Even then after I've gone through everything, it is not uncommon to find 3-5 pieces out of 100 lapua that are just "different." Those different pieces of brass will almost always cause flyers. When I discover them along the way, I be sure to cull them into a separate batch that I use strictly for fouling/testing other things.



  • @orkan

    Agreed! I'm finding my once fired Federal Gold Medal brass more consistent and predictable than virgin brass.
    I'm always tempted to work new brass before loading to increase consistency.


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