Hornady Case Head Seperation



  • I've been seeing signs of case head separation after only 3 firings on the majority of the Hornady brass I've been reloading. I know this brass won't last as long as some of the better brands but was thinking I should get more then 3 firings from it.

    This is a TS Customs barreled action with LP action and Benchmark barrel in 6.5 Creedmoor.

    This brass started out as loaded ammo, Hornady American Gunner 140 HPBT. After shooting I used Forster FL die and CoAx to size using the methods Orkan explained in a video for bumping the shoulder. Trimmed all the brass and chamfered. Tumbled with rice and loaded with 40.5 grains H4350 and a 140 grain Hornady ELD-M. The second reloading I didn't trim.

    Should I be expecting more then 3 firings from the brass? Anything I should be checking? Does Hornady have have different levels of brass? (Would this brass from relatively cheap ammo be of lesser quality then the brass used in their match ammo or the brass sold for reloading?)

    I will go back and verify how much I am bumping the chamber but not sure what else I can do.



  • That’s been my limited experience with Hornady brass.



  • It is possible that the factory brass you fired the first time and setup your shoulder bump with was not completely formed to your chamber and you inadvertently bumped the shoulder too far.



  • Just checked several rounds. Everything says am bumping the shoulder 0.006-0.007". I little more than desired I guess. For this next batch I will work on getting it closer to 0.002-0.003". Maybe I will be able to get an extra load or 2 out of it.



  • @bear9350 said in Hornady Case Head Seperation:

    Just checked several rounds. Everything says am bumping the shoulder 0.006-0.007". I little more than desired I guess. For this next batch I will work on getting it closer to 0.002-0.003". Maybe I will be able to get an extra load or 2 out of it.

    .006-.007" will do it.



  • Setback of .0015 to .002 is plenty for a bolt gun. If you listen to the details in the sizing video, you'll remember that it takes as many as 4-5 firings for brass to fully shape to the chamber. Until that point, setback can not be properly determined due to the brass still being worked.

    Easy way to overcome this is to simply neck size and load/fire an individual case until it will no longer go back in the chamber it was fired in. That will usually help bypass the error in attempting to measure a case which isn't fully formed.

    Five to 7 thousandths of setback, even on a fully formed case, is definitely enough to cause separation. On a non-fully formed case, you're likely talking about a 10 thousandths disparity from actual chamber dimensions.