Blurry vision ?



  • I've detected a pattern, that if I should about 100rds of 30 caliber rifle in about a 50 minute period. My vision starts to "blur" a bit. If I get off the gun, I'm fine. Is this "olde man blurry eye syndrome" or the beginning of "deteched retina" or "normal shooter eye fatigue" or "something else" ???

    I guess I had been trying to shoot 20rds per day every day ... but now I'm bunching it up more on the weekends and so this is a new problem for me ... but I've never shot this many 30 cal rounds in 50 mins regularly before.



  • Eye fatigue is very common, and worsens the older we get.

    This is especially true in the prone position due to oxygen deprivation affecting the eyes before anything else, and people are notoriously bad at breathing correctly when laying on the ground.



  • Ok thanks. At least I probably don't have detached retina (never had that before ... and don't want to ... it doesn't sound like fun !)

    The shooting regimen will continue :)



  • This is a good rule to follow using a computer and I don't know why it wouldn't apply to shooting sessions.
    "When working at a computer, you should follow the 20-20-20 rule – look at something twenty feet away from your computer every twenty minutes for twenty seconds."
    I can vouch for old age and eye fatigue being sixty and I have abused my eyes to the max. Over twenty years working on the water and never wore shades, not one time. I just can't stand them but I know I have to wear safety glasses shooting and when operating any power tool. I ended up in a doctors office three times in my life for eye injuries, one time was very serious after getting caustic soda in both of them. That was fun. I confess even after those events I have never been to an opthalmologist much less an optometrist but I passed my last eye test for my drivers license with flying colors. But seriously, pay attention to your eyes and there is some maintenance to prevent dry eye and allergies that cause a lot of problems.



  • @bigfoot that 20-20-20 is good advice.
    There are also exercises that benefit the eyes that I would advise learning.
    Us older folks start to get less stretchy as we age and can cause very serious problems in our vision. Macular holes can develop. Macular degeneration is another over 60 issue.
    Cataracts are another age related issue I have personally experienced. My eyes are bionic, having artificial lens, with great vision. Even with the plastic lenses I had a scare a while back where my right eye's vision was greatly depreciated.



  • @mamalukino
    My wife is a computer instructor and has had many issues with her eyes. High pressure, uveitis and has bionic vision after her cataract surgeries with high dollar lenses implanted. It used to drive me crazy, everything she saw on the ground was a snake. Now if she hollers snake I come a running. Kansas was referring to a detached retina and should be concerned if firing high powered firearms is a frequent activity. My wife's optometrist referred her to a specialist in Houston after a visit for eyeglasses years back, actually he has both titles the other is hard to spell, and what he diagnosed as uveitis could also had been a detached retina. We went to the retina institute there at Scurlock Towers and saw Dr Butner for a four hour examination and retina scan. One of the questions his nurse asked was if she shot high power rifles which perked me up and she said they had patients with retina damage that coincided with the concussion from high powered weapons. They also treated professional boxers there also but my wife has never been in the ring, I don't think so nor had she ever shot any guns at that time. She did have a bad case of uveitis and had floaters all in her line of vision. Couldn't even drive a car. They went away with medication. Anyway, take fish oil pills and use an eye lubricant and give them a rest. Those tiny muscles work their ass off doing their job. As for me, I take a rash of heat for not using our vision insurance I just have a bad case of white coat syndrome.