.30-06 Options for Yotes?



  • Hey guys. My precision rifle is a .30-06. It has a 30 inch Bartlein Barrel. The twist rate is 1:10. I am still looking for that perfect recipe for the heavy weight bullets which is what I intended to shoot with this gun. However, I would like to try some other loads with it as well. Specifically for coyotes. I currently don't have a clear understanding of the relationship between bullet weights, barrel length and twist rate. My question is, Berger has a 115 Grain bullet in .30 cal., how do you think this bullet will perform in my rifle. Should I just stay with the heavier bullets and use them? Interested in hearing what you think.



  • You can't really "over-stabilize" a bullet, but you can over-spin them to the point of failure.

    There is a simple formula you use to determine a bullet's RPM.

    MV X 720/Twist Rate (in inches) = RPM

    So, for instance, say we had a 6.5 creedmoor with an 8 twist barrel and bullet moving out at 2775fps.

    2775 X 720 / 8 = 249,750RPM

    Next let me try to address your next question, which is probably: Well how much RPM can a bullet take? The answer is dependent upon specific bullet design. Light jacketed varmint bullets tend to be capable of less RPM than thick jacketed match bullets. Yet you'd be surprised what these little pills can endure. You really don't have much to worry about until you get north of 350,000RPM.

    Given the above, then the real concern is ensuring you are stable in the first place. The best way to figure that out is to either use your smart phone and an app such as Shooter, or to go to Berger's website and use their stability calculator. Anything above 1.4 stability factor is considered stable. The closer you get to 2.0, the better off you'll be as your velocity bleeds off at range.

    The short answer is that I wouldn't hesitate to try the light weight 30 cal bullets in your rifle with a 10 twist. You may find it difficult to achieve the accuracy you are looking for if you are throated long, but then again, it might just fall into your lap. Won't know until you try!



  • @orkan

    Roger and thanks!



  • Let me throw this at you as well if you don't mind. Looks like you have shot a coyote or two. I guess the only reason I was thinking about the smaller bullets is because the yote is a smaller animal. Plus I thought that If I could minimize pelt damage then maybe I would do something with the pelt. Just seems most yote takers are shooting 22-250 or 233 etc etc. Maybe a .30 caliber bullet is still a .30 caliber bullet even in 115 Gr configuration and it is still going to be like throwing a Volkswagen at the critter. If the 115 Gr bullet is going to whollop the heck out of it and destroy the pelt then I suppose I could stay with the 190 Gr bullets I have. I enjoy hunting and I am looking for more trigger time and I have been itching to try predator hunting.



  • Seen these for many years, but never did try them, maybe somebody can pipe up with experiences using these.

    http://www.eabco.com/remington-accelerator-sabots.html

    http://www.sabotreloadingpro.com/

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

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  • If you haven't got a set yet and you are planning on using hand calls take a look at the Primal Rights Predator Calls!

    http://www.primalrights.com/equipment/predator-calls

    I've been on a LOT of sets with Orkan over the years and I don't even know how many different sets of calls he put to use during them. Since he started using the string/rope/cable combo the dogs respond very differently. When one got to a point where I was thinking "there's no way he's coming in any further, this field is WIDE open!" He would give a little squeak and sure enough in a little further he came! This actually happened on our first morning out with them. I was fully expecting this dog to come in along a fence line to the right or left of us, but instead he was dragged straight at us!



  • @jekyl said:

    Let me throw this at you as well if you don't mind. Looks like you have shot a coyote or two. I guess the only reason I was thinking about the smaller bullets is because the yote is a smaller animal. Plus I thought that If I could minimize pelt damage then maybe I would do something with the pelt. Just seems most yote takers are shooting 22-250 or 233 etc etc. Maybe a .30 caliber bullet is still a .30 caliber bullet even in 115 Gr configuration and it is still going to be like throwing a Volkswagen at the critter. If the 115 Gr bullet is going to whollop the heck out of it and destroy the pelt then I suppose I could stay with the 190 Gr bullets I have. I enjoy hunting and I am looking for more trigger time and I have been itching to try predator hunting.

    Obviously the 17-22 caliber in certain cartridges provides excellent results when used against coyotes. Minimal fur damage and complete energy dump which will anchor a coyote nicely when decent shot placement is provided. I feel the .223rem and similar cartridges are too small for our northern yotes. They seem to work alright on smaller desert dogs of the southwest. However, if you want to hear all about my theories on cartridge selection, I assume you will start another thread about that.

    In regard to your 30.06, my suggestion would be to use the heavy bullets that you intend to shoot normally. The light bullets would likely grenade hardcore upon impact and rip some obscene holes. If fur saving is your goal, you'll want to stick to the heavy bullets, and avoid solid bone on the coyote. However, this too provides a problem, because the only way the heavies will save fur is if they pencil through. This will give you a small entrance, small exit, and virtually no energy transfer. The predictable result, is a lot of runners, dead on their feet... sometimes for several hundred yards. The other option is to hit the coyote in their center vitals, which is completely unlike that of deer or other animals you may be used to hunting. Coyotes carry their vitals pretty far forward, similar to that of African game. Thus, a broadside shot directly in line with the front shoulders is the desired POA. If you do that with a 30.06, I would expect the immediate area around the coyote to be covered with red, and lots of fur. ;)

    @mamalukino said:

    Seen these for many years, but never did try them, maybe somebody can pipe up with experiences using these.

    http://www.eabco.com/remington-accelerator-sabots.html

    http://www.sabotreloadingpro.com/

    The accelerator rounds are extremely poor, both from a performance standpoint and especially from an accuracy standpoint. It is usually very difficult if not impossible to achieve better than 2.5-1.5MOA. Those that I've tried over the years, struggled to keep all rounds on a target the size of a paper plate at 100yds. I would definitely avoid these.



  • Well scratch those sabots, I suppose if they worked there would have been alot of positive chatter.
    Nice having voices of experience to go to; saves time and money.

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

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