Spotting Scopes



  • As a newbie, I don't know much about spotting scopes. What qualities and features should I be looking at when considering a first spotter? How much magnification is needed to spot at 500-1000yds?

    And what about a mil/moa reticle? I figured that would be a reasonably standard feature of spotters for LR shooters. But looking at the market, I don't actually see that many with a reticle.



  • Depends on what you're trying to do.

    If you just want to see bullet holes in paper at great distances, then a target cam is a much better purchase.

    If you're trying to spot animals or call trace on misses, then a spotter can be quite handy. Reticles are great so that you can actually call in angular units. Important detail. Otherwise you're stuck guessing based on known size relationships.

    Hensoldt and Swarovski spotters rule the roost. You'll have to part with serious coin to own one. Vortex, kowa, and a few other oddball brands occupy the mid range and low end.



  • Reviving an old thread here.

    I had someone that works at a firearms industry supplier call me last night to let me know I have an opportunity at getting a high-end (Swarovski/Zeiss/Leica) spotting scope at a good deal. What I don't know is how much objective size do I need. Is a 25-60x with a 65mm in something high-end enough for typical work out to maybe 1200-1400yds? Or do I need to try and go 80mm?

    BTW: I also have a shot at some range-finding binos, I think he said Zeiss Victory's. Since I don't have a range finder either, would this possibly be a better route for now? I have never had any of this stuff, so I don't know how it all operates in the real world.



  • Also, angled vs. straight.

    And if I wasn't clear with the previous post, this is for use at the range, spotting steel & paper. Fairly static targets, at most PRS-style shooting. I don't have any plans to use it for hunting, if that makes any difference.



  • @flyinphill If you don't have a range finder... you definitely want to go that route.

    Spotters are very specialized tools that most people will not need unless scouting for animals. ... but you NEED a LRF. A good one.



  • @orkan He sent me the list. There is a Zeiss 10x42 Victory RF, as well as a Swarofski 10x42 EL Range. Both about the same price. Any preferences there?



  • @flyinphill I prefer the swarovski.



  • @orkan From a few comparison reviews I saw, for what they are worth, pretty much everyone agreed that the Swarofski has slightly better glass. While they all also agreed the Zeiss has a more intuitive and quicker reacting laser, with a longer range limit. Plus the Zeiss has some ballistic app that I don't know if I would even care about. Like I said, this from reviewers that I don't know anything about.

    Have you used both of these in the laser range model?



  • @flyinphill said in Spotting Scopes:

    Have you used both of these in the laser range model?

    @flyinphill said in Spotting Scopes:

    everyone agreed that the Swarofski has slightly better glass.

    Yes I have. Also, there's no F in swarovski.

    QgT74qom.png



  • @orkan Yeah, not really sure why I spelled it that way. I spelled it both correctly and with an "f" depending on which post you look at. I blame it on lack of sleep, at least that is my story.

    Either way, I had my friend put in for the SwaroVski ELs on my behalf. If more than one person at his company put in for it, then they will do a random drawing to see which one gets it. I should know week after next.



  • @flyinphill said in Spotting Scopes:

    Also, angled vs. straight.

    And if I wasn't clear with the previous post, this is for use at the range, spotting steel & paper. Fairly static targets, at most PRS-style shooting. I don't have any plans to use it for hunting, if that makes any difference.

    I saw this graphic today:
    117841523_10158565503040758_1342920226611458799_o.jpg



  • @midwestside I got both. BTX which is angled bino 30x, STX which is straight 75x, with my 95mm objective. :)