Back country elk hunt & protection...



  • Hello everyone, it's been a while since I posted anything meaningful. Way to much life going on right now. Anyway, in about 3 weeks I leave for a 9 day elk hunt in the mountains of CO. I will be taking my Springfield XD Mod2 for protection with me, but unfortunately I don't have a OWB holster. I would like to carry it on the hip support of either one of my packs. However, I am open to suggestions like thigh or chest options. My pack for taking all my stuff is this one: Outdoorsmans Optics Hunter Pack. The daypack is this one: Tenzing TZ2220 Day Pack. The gun below is what I am taking, let me know what you guys think.
    XDG9801HC_1200x782.png



  • First suggestion, watch this video:
    It references 1911, but they can be used interchangebly with XD's.


    (sorry, a little sarcasm for all the resident XD fans here :) )

    My $0.02:

    I use a Eberlestock gunslinger2. I’ve shot the occasional match that incorporate pistol and rifle,
    so I’ve wanted fairly quick access to both the rifle (scabbard) and pistol(hip belt) in the past.

    I opted to use a kydex OWB holster that had two belt loop type attachments.
    My pack has molle on the hip belt, but your hunter optic pack could probably facilitate similar belt attachments for the wider webbing.
    It will sit a little high for drawing, but you should not be drawing from it with high frequency anyhow and it would certainly be quicker than going to the scabbard.

    I’ve never tried the thigh rigs, and I know it’s frowned upon to offer suggestions based on theory on this site without real experience,
    but I’d only offer that most opinions I’ve heard about the thigh rigs is that they wear on you after a long treks/carry (feels like a big boat anchor). Maybe others can confirm?

    I’m not sure if you’re going through a lot of thick brush,
    in which case a chest rig might not snag as much as the hip location,
    or if you run any Bino’s on the chest, but my experience with the hip location has been good thus far.



  • I use either a chest rig, or pack mounted holster depending on the situation.
    Hip holsters don't work well for me while hunting for two reasons...one my layers of clothes cover it to the point I'm unable to access it, or two, my slung rifle is banging into it. DW



  • @midwestside said:

    First suggestion, watch this video:
    It references 1911, but they can be used interchangebly with XD's.


    (sorry, a little sarcasm for all the resident XD fans here :) )

    Hahahahaha! That was funny.

    My $0.02:

    I use a Eberlestock gunslinger2. I’ve shot the occasional match that incorporate pistol and rifle,
    so I’ve wanted fairly quick access to both the rifle (scabbard) and pistol(hip belt) in the past.

    I opted to use a kydex OWB holster that had two belt loop type attachments.
    My pack has molle on the hip belt, but your hunter optic pack could probably facilitate similar belt attachments for the wider webbing.
    It will sit a little high for drawing, but you should not be drawing from it with high frequency anyhow and it would certainly be quicker than going to the scabbard.

    I’ve never tried the thigh rigs, and I know it’s frowned upon to offer suggests based on theory on this site without real experience,
    but I’d only offer that most opinions I’ve heard about the thigh rigs is that they wear on you after a long treks/carry (feels like a big boat anchor). Maybe others can confirm?

    I’m not sure if you’re going through a lot of thick brush,
    in which case a chest rig might not snag as much as the hip location,
    or if you run any Bino’s on the chest, but my experience with the hip location has been good thus far.

    Yeah, I was looking at a OWB Kydex last night at Sportsman's Warehouse and it seems that it would do what I need. I am not really concerned about having to draw fast, it's just something that I want to have handy if I need to scare a bear or a mountain lion. I think what I am going to do is take my day pack and gun to sportsmans and try out the Kydex to see if it works.



  • I also found this kit that looks pretty good and will allow me to conceal carry and open carry when trekking in the mountains. I think with the paddle for OWB carry I can either carry on the hip support for either of packs or chest carry as well.



  • Just bring a little beretta bobcat 22. Put it in your pocket.

    If a bear attacks, pull your 22 and put one in your buddy's thigh. Then run.

    I read this in some gun rag 20 years ago. Still makes me chuckle!



  • @orkan said:

    Just bring a little beretta bobcat 22. Put it in your pocket.

    If a bear attacks, pull your 22 and put one in your buddy's thigh. Then run.

    I read this in some gun rag 20 years ago. Still makes me chuckle!

    Hahahahahahaha!



  • @orkan

    Remind me not to go hunting with you..



  • If you’re really thinking you need backup protection then you should be carrying a serious stopper instead of a 45ACP. A Ruger Bear Gun in 454 Casull or 50 S&W Mag is safe, ultra reliable and one shot will reform most bad actors. My 460 turned a hungry bear into a rug for my nephew.

    Timin' has a lot to do with the outcome of a rain dance.

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  • @rr2241tx said:

    If you’re really thinking you need backup protection then you should be carrying a serious stopper instead of a 45ACP. A Ruger Bear Gun in 454 Casull or 50 S&W Mag is safe, ultra reliable and one shot will reform most bad actors. My 460 turned a hungry bear into a rug for my nephew.

    Don't forget the 460 S&W mag. Sorry, didn't see the last sentence.



  • Heavy hand cannons have massive stopping power. .44 mag and up are more than capable of taking down bear should it attack. Yet if you choose to carry one of those I recommend shooting several hundred rounds in the weeks leading up to your trip. They are not easy handguns to master or even be proficient with. Many people cannot even shoot the 500 without "doubletapping" due to the recoil. The airlite 44 mag is a handful to shoot, but can be a very good option given enough practice. It is also much easier to carry.



  • I think whatever you have is fine, get some hot house ammo and make sure it shoots.

    This is both the bullets you need and a great explanation of shooting bears.
    https://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_list&c=108

    I’m gonna get a glock 20. 10,000 ft/lb of hate in one magazine. I can put a light on it too in the event bears come into camp at night.

    Bears aren’t bullet proof and won’t know the difference between calibers, you only have 2 seconds and 2-3 shots after the bear charges, it’ll be a head on shot and most people shoot an auto faster and much better than a revolver.

    Either You kill him outright with a cns shot or You penetrate to the heart and Lungs and he has time to maul you before dying like DeCaprio in “The Revenant.”

    Happy hunting

    RLTW
    (This space for rent)

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  • @dddoo7
    I'm with DDD on this one. I have a 44 mag Super Blackhawk with a 10.5" barrel. For me it's tough to get a quick accurate second shot with Big guns unless you practice. If you miss 1st shot cause of fight or flight adrenalin rush, well ouch. I like my Glock 30S double stack 45. extended mag holds 13. 45ACP 230 grain bullets may not be moving as fast as tge big boys, I believe I can put a few into a bear if he's closing the distance on me. The thing about bears is that their heart rate is very slow, so even if you take out the heart, they still have the ability to put some hurt on you.



  • @dddoo7
    Didn't an accidental double with a 500 kill a lady a few years ago?
    Second shot was under her chin and straight up. There was supposedly video that I declined to watch.
    Boyfriend handed her one fully loaded.
    I started my stepdaughter out with just one in the 9mm magazine.
    Sure enough she was startled and spun around and swept me and everyone else standing there.
    Went back to the Kimber 22 for her.



  • @hypo

    I didn't hear about any specific times that happened...but it is a real possibility. Any heavy hitting revolver requires a learning curve. I will shoot the 500 with more than one round in the chamber...but I single loaded it for the first 150 or so just because it made me nervous. And that is after I had gotten comfortable with the airlite 44 mag with stout loads.

    It is a very wise thing to single load for shooters that are not familiar with guns...especially guns with higher recoil.



  • Great suggestions everyone, however, getting a big handgun for bear protection is not on the priority list. In Colorado we only have black bears and they are not that big and they do prefer to avoid people. The Wildlife trainer that I took the hunter safety course with said to use a pair of pans to make a racket and the bears typically flee. The other thing is that I am going with 2 military buddies and they have a 357Mag and a 44Mag that they are bringing with as well. I also have a can of bear spray as well. So I think I should be good, I just want a way to get to the gun quickly if the need arises to make some noise. I know the 9mm will only tickle the bear, unless it's really close and I can put 2-3 shots in the head.


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