Shooting Fundamentals practice...



  • I took my daughter to the range on Sat. to practice her shooting with the .22 and I did 2 things myself. I shot a pressure ladder (posting that on another thread) and I shot a dot drill, practicing what I learned in the spring training, building my position for every shot. I set myself only 2 goals for the day: 1) build the shooting position from scratch for every shot and make sure I do each step correctly, and 2) keep the reticle on the target. I started the 1st goal with about 20 mins of dry fire, building each step slowly, then I moved to live fire, at which point I started to do my snapshots to see where my rifle would end up. In this case, my rifle would end up directly left of the target and I would loose the target in the scope. So remembering that Greg would tell me that my shoulders were not square to the bore of the rifle, I started adjusting. It took me a bit to get it where the rifle recoil was pushing almost straight back, I think the last 4 shots is where I didn't lose the target in the scope, but I learned something new.

    The plastic feet on my tripod spin when I load it, and since this time I gave my shooting mat to my daughter and I was shooting off the concrete, when I would load the bipod, the plastic feet would spin and the contact between the buttstock and my shoulder would be loose. So in the last few shots, I put my data book under the bipod and as I was able to load it better, I accomplished to keep the target on my scope the last 3-4 shots. Until I can get an Atlas, I am going to crazy glue the crap out of those plastic feet to keep them from rotating/spinning.

    Below are my results, keeping in mind that hitting all dots was not a goal for this session. So how many honest shots? Not sure, but if I felt I built my shooting position correctly and executed the fundamentals slowly and deliberately, I did my snapshots and tried to correct my mistakes, then most of them were honest shots, no matter where the bullet landed. Greg, thanks a bunch for give me the tools to self identify my own issues and improve little by little. I can't wait to see how my shooting improves over the next year.

    tpihXUp.jpg



  • Great job. From the looks of things, it's probably not all you. Have you been able to create some tight groups with this rifle before? From the looks of it you may have an ammo/barrel issue that needs worked out too. I'm basing that off what's shown on your target only. To get rounds to scatter like that, you've pretty much got to be yanking on the trigger (flinch style) or your rifle simply isn't up to the task. Minor variations in NPA and various other fundamentals aren't going to produce scatter like that on their own unless the operator is really messing up. I've seen you shoot, and you don't appear to be messing up to that level.

    If we were to overlay all your shots, some are pushing well on the plus side of 1moa... so that tells me its likely there's a precision problem with the rifle. The "accuracy" then being assigned to things you do, would likely be much better were the rifle behaving itself. This is much speculation however as I didn't get to watch you make the shots.

    What I'm saying here is that your improvements as a shooter will not only come from technique. I've helped countless shooters whom have shown targets like yours above and by simply re-barreling or getting a new rifle, they cut the group size in half. Then through application of technique over time, they cut them by half again.

    Though I will tell you one thing for certain: You will not be able to identify the real benefit's of the work you are doing on technique if the results are masked behind a poor performing rifle system. (to include ammo) In order to learn, your rifle must be predictable. Meaning if you see your reticle go high and way left, and your round goes 1" low right... something's not really working out there. Conversely, if you can explain every round on that page based on an accurate shot call and subsequent reticle movement... then it indeed is all you. Though you must trust yourself. Remember what I told you in class. If the round doesn't go where the reticle is or goes... it wasn't you. At least not your technique during the shot. It might have been you at the loading bench. Might have been you when you tightened the scope mounting. Might have been you when you selected the rifle. etc etc. Lots of things to chase down when it's not going right. However, as long as you know it's not you, you are free to chase them down knowing what it wasn't!

    A great exercise when doing the dot drill: Bring another dot drill and as you engage one target at a time, write on the dot drill next to you exactly where your shot call was for each dot, one shot at a time. Then you can compare your call with your impacts without having to remember each. One dot, one call, one shot, at one time. Then when you move to the next dot, you can forget the previous entirely.



  • @orkan said:

    A great exercise when doing the dot drill: Bring another dot drill and as you engage one target at a time, write on the dot drill next to you exactly where your shot call was for each dot, one shot at a time. Then you can compare your call with your impacts without having to remember each. One dot, one call, one shot, at one time. Then when you move to the next dot, you can forget the previous entirely.

    Great suggestion here, I will try that next time I go to the range. I have had small groups before with my reloads. Those shots were from leftover ammo from the class, which is box ammo. As you probably saw, I am in the process of developing a load, so I'll see how that goes. If I can't see any improvement with my reloads, I'll have to look at other things to see where the problem(s) lie(s).



  • I actually thought of doing exactly that just haven't gotten around to it yet.



  • There are databook pages for dot drill that you can use also.

    http://www.primalrights.com/databook/target_dotdrill.pdf



  • @orkan Thanks a bunch Greg, I think these help a great deal. I created my own for when I do load development with an image of the grid targets I use, that way I can mark the shots on the page as I shoot them. This one will come in handy next time.



  • This is good info...I'm going to try this as soon as I get in from offshore...

    Anyone can get angry — that is easy — or give or spend money; but to do this to the right person, to the right extent, at the right time, with the right motive, and in the right way, that is not for everyone, nor is it easy.

    Aristotle

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