Dies for 6.5CM



  • What are people using for 6.5CM dies and would you recommend what you are using?

    I currently resize with a Redding body die and a neck bushing die. The process is not too bad and I know I can get a Redding full length bushing die to do both of my current steps in 1. Are there any other dies that work well for this caliber that I should consider. I am looking to streamline my process and reduce steps where I can.



  • @ramirojpc

    I ordered a custom full length non bushing whidden die for my 308. It is impressive quality and works great. I don't intend to go back to Redding for precision loading.



  • @dddoo7 said:

    @ramirojpc

    I ordered a custom full length non bushing whidden die for my 308. It is impressive quality and works great. I don't intend to go back to Redding for precision loading.

    By custom I assume you provided the measurements for them to create a die specific to the dimensions you wanted/needed. Is that accurate? If so, how did you determine the dimensions for your 308 die?



  • @ramirojpc

    I mailed them three pieces of fired brass and they make it according to the dimensions of the brass.



  • What ddd007 says. I have a Whidden resizing die for all calibers I have. The die works to perfection, based on three pieces of fired brass.



  • Because I've never used or seen a custom Whidden die I have a question. Does your ram go all the up to the bottom of the die and make contact, or do you have a 1/4" of the case head sticking out like you do on most other dies?



  • This is where mine is set with a piece of brass in it. There is still a few thousandths adjustment to play with the headspace...but not 1/4"

    2C49D235-3F3D-47F8-9967-82120C30488E_zps9hnmbled.jpg



  • Thanks @dddoo7. So you can't really over size your brass then. Thats what I was hoping.



  • @norcal_in_az

    Well...the dies are short enough that you need to check the headspace as you adjust them...but I want them that way.

    Whidden makes a really cool micrometer headspace gauge that I bought at the same time. I have this die set to bump the headspace about .002". If the die is bottomed out it would probably bump the shoulder about .008"...which is more than I want...but still within SAAIMI (or whatever it is).

    The hornady comparator on a caliper works well too.



  • @norcal_in_az said:

    Thanks @dddoo7. So you can't really over size your brass then. Thats what I was hoping.

    A sizing die should be designed so you can "over-size" it. If it touches the shell plate before you've set the shoulder back too far, then you won't be able to precisely determine the amount of setback between firings and can end up with brass you can't chamber.



  • @orkan said:

    @norcal_in_az said:

    Thanks @dddoo7. So you can't really over size your brass then. Thats what I was hoping.

    A sizing die should be designed so you can "over-size" it. If it touches the shell plate before you've set the shoulder back too far, then you won't be able to precisely determine the amount of setback between firings and can end up with brass you can't chamber.

    Makes sense.

    I was thinking cause it was custom ground that the ram could dead stop against it setting back your brass just enough.



  • "Just enough," changes based on individual requirements of each rifle and components used. The amount of setback is an individual measurement. You wouldn't set back semi-auto ammo the same as you would setback bolt rifle ammo... for instance.



  • Seen some issues with Whidden dies over the last few months with QC. Wrong size expanders, bullet steams being wrong , things like that.

    I have here 6.5 creed set. and you can certainly push the shoulder back in to next week if you aren't careful.



  • I had an issue with one of widdens dies too.

    The expander stem was bent, there were chatter marks on the threads on the stem like the tool skipped when they were cutting it, and there were gouges on the ball and stem from where they installed the ball with pliers.

    Sample size of one but it was not the best first impression and I think I'll be going with forster factory dies or another custom made brand going forward.

    I will say that they dealt with it quickly when I called about it.

    Edit to add that as far as I can tell the die itself is perfect I only had issues with the expanders and stems

    RLTW
    (This space for rent)

    0


  • Whidden is significantly better than redding/rcbs/lee/forster/etc... but they are not as nice as super-high end wilson-type custom dies. They have the best price to performance ratio available right now. Obviously they will have some issues from time to time, and they've taken care of folks quite well in my experience. The problems are usually small, dealing with non-critical things. Other dies tend to have much more severe problems. The whidden dies have produced the most concentric ammo for me out of all the brands I've used thus far. I think I have 8 sets or so from them.



  • Warn tool custom are where it's at if you got the coin. The die it self has inserts you change out for calibers. Think of a bushing die. Bushing would the caliber you are reloading for and the die it self is the main housing. They are expensive but few friends have them. Why I haven't bought my own. LOL Can't use with Co-ax though.



  • What advantage does that offer vs a standard die in a coax?

    Also does a Whidden seating die do anything special vs a forster seater? The mic top option for both of course.

    RLTW
    (This space for rent)

    0


  • Ok, so the Whidden dies don't use a bushing, they use a stemp with an expander ball? So far what has been said makes sense to me and since its as simple as sending 3 fired cases, it's a no brainer.

    But since the die will be made to the 3 fired cases, what happens when one has to replace the barrel on the gun. Will the resized brass from those custom dies still work on the gun with a new barrel?



  • @ramirojpc

    I don't know for sure...and I have thought about this...but I will bet if the same reamer is used then the same dies will work.

    however...worse comes to worse a new die with a new barrel is not a real big deal.

    and whidden makes bushing dies but they can also make it to fit your chambers dimensions so that you don't need to change bushings.



  • @ramirojpc said:

    But since the die will be made to the 3 fired cases, what happens when one has to replace the barrel on the gun. Will the resized brass from those custom dies still work on the gun with a new barrel?

    If you own your reamer, you simply chamber the next barrel with the same reamer and all is good.

    If it's a different reamer, then you could encounter problems.



  • Crap, I had forgotten about this thread. @orkan, educate me, I have heard of reamers, but I don't know what they are or what they are used for.

    Here's my plan/thinking which might help. My current gun is a Savage 12 LRP, and when the barrel needs to be replaced, I want to replace it with a Shilen barrel, mostly because they make Savage drop-in barrels. It's been a while since I looked at their site, but I think you can send them spent cases and the action and they can "make" (don't know the proper term) the barrel and mount it on the action. If that is the case, technically I could use the same 3 cases for the whidden dies and for the Shillen barrel, and things should line up, right?



  • Reamer is what is used to cut chambers. It's what defines the dimensional characteristics of the chamber. How the reamer is specified, is how the chamber ends up, excluding the natural material springback and other machining methodology.

    Kiff_ECT_pilotreamerWEB.jpg

    You don't send brass to have a reamer made. You can, but it's foolish, as the brass has too much movement and springlike characteristics to take solid measurements. You DEFINE the specifications for the reamer/chamber based on your desired performance requirements, then the brass properly fire formed in that chamber can be used to hone custom dies.... in that order.



  • @orkan

    why can't one purchase a reamer...use it to cut the chamber and then also use it to cut a die...and then keep it for the next barrel in the same caliber?



  • You can't cut a sizing die the same as the chamber, it wouldn't resize. If the brass just came out of your chamber, it would go right in the die and not be sized. You would have to order a "sizing reamer" in the same order.

    @tscustoms would be able to explain all the different options better than I, but there are several different reamers you can get in a "set." Roughing reamer, finish reamer, sizing reamer, etc. All can be ordered on the same order so as to, in theory, get everything with the correct amount of tolerance.



  • @orkan said:

    Reamer is what is used to cut chambers. It's what defines the dimensional characteristics of the chamber. How the reamer is specified, is how the chamber ends up, excluding the natural material springback and other machining methodology.

    Kiff_ECT_pilotreamerWEB.jpg

    You don't send brass to have a reamer made. You can, but it's foolish, as the brass has too much movement and springlike characteristics to take solid measurements. You DEFINE the specifications for the reamer/chamber based on your desired performance requirements, then the brass properly fire formed in that chamber can be used to hone custom dies.... in that order.

    Ah, ok, I think this makes sense. So in my case, it would be better to wait until I need to replace the barrel, specify the reamer to cut the chamber, then use fired brass from that chamber to order the dies. So if this is the case, does that mean then that I would purchase a set of reamers and send them to the barrel maker to cut the chamber to my reamer specs the next time I need to replace the barrel for that caliber. Is this correct?

    When you say, "define the specifications for the reamer/chamber based on your desired performance requirements", what do you mean? Do you mean moa or sub-moa performance requirements? or something else? Please elaborate.



  • @ramirojpc said:

    When you say, "define the specifications for the reamer/chamber based on your desired performance requirements", what do you mean? Do you mean moa or sub-moa performance requirements? or something else? Please elaborate.

    Things like, how to configure the cartridge for optimal pressure curves and neck tension. ... and I'm not going to tell you how, because this is one of the cornerstones of what Travis @tscustoms and I have had to come out of pocket substantially to learn over the years. Our customers benefit from this experience at no charge, but I consider this to be "trade secret" type information. When someone calls us and wants a barrel or build done, we have a series of questions which let us know what they are looking to do, and then set them up with the best possible chamber to meet that end.



  • A guy could indeed buy a chamber reamer then a resize reamer according to the dimensions of the chamber reamer.
    However, with good reamers running over $200 and a set of die blanks with micrometer seater running around $200, it doesn't make much sense to me to not just go buy a custom set from Whidden for $280. Especially if you're going to pay a smith to build them for you. In my shop that die is going to be treated just like a barrel and billed accordingly.



  • @orkan said:

    @ramirojpc said:

    When you say, "define the specifications for the reamer/chamber based on your desired performance requirements", what do you mean? Do you mean moa or sub-moa performance requirements? or something else? Please elaborate.

    Things like, how to configure the cartridge for optimal pressure curves and neck tension. ... and I'm not going to tell you how, because this is one of the cornerstones of what Travis @tscustoms and I have had to come out of pocket substantially to learn over the years. Our customers benefit from this experience at no charge, but I consider this to be "trade secret" type information. When someone calls us and wants a barrel or build done, we have a series of questions which let us know what they are looking to do, and then set them up with the best possible chamber to meet that end.

    That's fair, but at least I know what you mean. All of this is way beyond my little noggin and what I know so far about this sport, but thank you for sharing all this info. I hope one day I can have the funds to get into custom rifles like the ones you guys make.



  • You will. Focus on what you want.
    Slowly investing in reloading tools is the stage I am at.
    Now that I have tried Lee, Redding, RCBS and Forster dies I have an idea of what I like. Will probably have to go Whidden for my Swiss rifle.
    Met him And his wife recently at a local match.
    Really nice people.
    He finished 4th in indoor Precision Air Rifle 3 Position.
    He shoots long range prone primarily. Standing was where he dropped points. Nearly perfect prone score.
    My friend was shooting Sporter Class.
    http://www.orionresults.com/team/EventResult.aspx?MatchID=1.2017.710165975.0&SubKey=466245752

    What one of the best prone shooters in the country can do.
    Target scan results.
    http://www.orionresults.com/team/IndividualScore.aspx?MatchID=1.2017.710165975.0&UniqueID=42



  • @ramirojpc said:

    I hope one day I can have the funds to get into custom rifles like the ones you guys make.

    It's just a decision. That's all. Put $50 into a savings account each month. In 10yrs, you can buy whatever precision rifle you want. At the end of the day, people seem to spend all the money they get, no matter how much they get. If you want a nice rifle, decide to buy one. Usually folks just constantly spend money on inferior rifles instead... or 4-wheelers... or the wifes purse... or the camper... or the boat... or the whatever the hell else.

    Don't make the mistake of thinking those of us with nice rifles are wealthy. It's a simple decision. That's all. You want to keep up with the Jones'... or do you want to have a nice rifle? You want a new flat screen TV... or do you want the best priming tool in the world? You want the wife to have a $3000 diamond... or do you want a TT315M?



  • @orkan said:

    @ramirojpc said:

    I hope one day I can have the funds to get into custom rifles like the ones you guys make.

    It's just a decision. That's all. Put $50 into a savings account each month. In 10yrs, you can buy whatever precision rifle you want. At the end of the day, people seem to spend all the money they get, no matter how much they get. If you want a nice rifle, decide to buy one. Usually folks just constantly spend money on inferior rifles instead... or 4-wheelers... or the wifes purse... or the camper... or the boat... or the whatever the hell else.

    Don't make the mistake of thinking those of us with nice rifles are wealthy. It's a simple decision. That's all. You want to keep up with the Jones'... or do you want to have a nice rifle? You want a new flat screen TV... or do you want the best priming tool in the world? You want the wife to have a $3000 diamond... or do you want a TT315M?

    This.

    My rifle is worth more than either one of my cars. My rimfire rifle is worth more than either one of my cars. I only have money to shoot because I don't have a car payment. I can put the same money into nice rifles and at the end of the day I'd rather drive my beater cars than shoot a savage. It would probably surprise you how little I make...but I skimp everywhere else so that I can shoot like I want to.



  • T-shirt Slogan Right there 007.
    I'd rather drive a beater Car than shoot a Savage.
    So true.
    Can't wait for my two car payments to be finished off. One drops this year and the car should last another 5.
    $312 a month right there.
    Good guns don't lose value like a car either.
    Some appreciate.



  • @dddoo7 said:

    @orkan said:

    @ramirojpc said:

    I hope one day I can have the funds to get into custom rifles like the ones you guys make.

    It's just a decision. That's all. Put $50 into a savings account each month. In 10yrs, you can buy whatever precision rifle you want. At the end of the day, people seem to spend all the money they get, no matter how much they get. If you want a nice rifle, decide to buy one. Usually folks just constantly spend money on inferior rifles instead... or 4-wheelers... or the wifes purse... or the camper... or the boat... or the whatever the hell else.

    Don't make the mistake of thinking those of us with nice rifles are wealthy. It's a simple decision. That's all. You want to keep up with the Jones'... or do you want to have a nice rifle? You want a new flat screen TV... or do you want the best priming tool in the world? You want the wife to have a $3000 diamond... or do you want a TT315M?

    This.

    My rifle is worth more than either one of my cars. My rimfire rifle is worth more than either one of my cars. I only have money to shoot because I don't have a car payment. I can put the same money into nice rifles and at the end of the day I'd rather drive my beater cars than shoot a savage. It would probably surprise you how little I make...but I skimp everywhere else so that I can shoot like I want to.

    This. I drive a 99 chevy pickup with 198000 on it. Ordered a DTA from Greg 3 weeks ago. I don't smoke, rarely drink, and don't live out of my means. I saved up for it for about 3 years.

    It's all about choices.



  • All very true, it's about choices.

    We are frugal spenders, we don't spend on much other than bills, food, housing, and the occasional movie and popcorn. My 2009 186K+ mile Suburban is all paid for from a loan from my 401(k), which paid me the interest rather than paying a bank.

    However, regarding custom rigs...I am a firm believer in moving up to better gear when my capabilities have outgrown my current gear. I know most of you guys dislike Savage, and I am sure you have your reasons, but my experience has been different. I don't believe I am at the point where I can out shoot my Savage yet. I would rather spend $ on myself 1st before spending on gear, that is why I begged my beloved to let me go to the spring training with Greg and some of you fine folks.

    I am not saying that I hope one day to have the funds to get a custom gun as a wishful thinking with no plan. There is a plan, but as all of you rightly point it out, it's about choices, and I have 2 kids going to college at the same time in a little over a year, so any savings go towards that for now. So I am sure I will get there, but right now I think my limited funds are better spent in me training to becoming a better shooter and when the capabilities of my Savage are limiting my own, I'll move up to something better.



  • @ramirojpc said:

    and when the capabilities of my Savage are limiting my own, I'll move up to something better.

    How will you know when this is?



  • @orkan said:

    How will you know when this is?

    Today? In all honesty, I have no idea. But if my experience as a photographer is an indication, as I learn more and grow in the craft I'll be able to tell if the gear is limiting me, probably when I notice that my performance with my gear stops yielding increasingly better results, even though I am sticking to good shooting fundamentals. For example, I remember when you posted about getting the Prometheus powder scale to be able to measure in the 100ths grains, and I asked you if you needed that kind of accuracy, you said that you had gotten to the point in your abilities where having more accurate & consistent powder charges will allow you to squeeze a bit more performance in your shooting. I assume you didn't know that when you started precision shooting. That is the point I am at now, even though I've been reloading for 3 years or so, only recently I started reloading with the intent on precision shooting. Heck, you'll probably cringe at this, but I am still reloading on a Lee turret press, but already saving for either a Forster or Hornady Iron Press. I am also, as time allows, reading up and learning more about reloading, that is why I asked here about the 6.5 dies. Which by the way, I have a question regarding this for the spring training, but I'll ask in that thread.



  • @ramirojpc said:

    For example, I remember when you posted about getting the Prometheus powder scale to be able to measure in the 100ths grains, and I asked you if you needed that kind of accuracy, you said that you had gotten to the point in your abilities where having more accurate & consistent powder charges will allow you to squeeze a bit more performance in your shooting.

    Not really the same thing. A rifle's capability is not determined by anything other than the rifle. Just because the shooter can't shoot it, or is feeding it junk ammo, does not change the rifles true capabilities.

    If you have a great rifle that is shooting poorly, you can determine whether it is the optic, shooter, maintenance, or ammo causing issues relatively easily. It's a straight forward troubleshooting process, if you're working with a proven rifle. If you do not have a great rifle, you can NOT determine any of the above, unless you get other equipment involved. Here recently on this very forum you've witnessed proof of this. @dddoo7 had his rifle all of a sudden not shoot quite good anymore. A proper cleaning and it was back to bug holes. Then recently again, it started shooting worse, and he discovered it was the brass. Were the rifle not capable of sub-1/4moa precision, he would not have been able to discover any of that, and thus would not have been able to advance his skills as a rifleman. If I did not have sub-1/4moa rifles, I would not need the reloading equipment nor the support equipment I have. I also would not have been able to develop sub-1/4moa rifle driving technique.

    The moral of the story here is the same as I've always said: You can not discover if you are a 1/4moa shooter with a 1moa rifle. Having a rifle that is not significantly better than you are, will hide the vast majority of true learning moments from you. Without a capable rifle, the rest is just theory and you may as well be pissing up a rope.

    The above is a fact. It is not an opinion, nor is it open to loose interpretation.

    Your financial situation is your own, none of my business, and completely separate from all of the above. All rifle related forums and the shooting community as a whole has made a lucrative business out of telling people exactly what you've proclaimed here. All it does effectively is separate people from their money, methodically and mercilessly. Lack of knowledge and true experience drives the entire thing. Those that steadfastly adhere to my advice find themselves in precision rifle nirvana, learning infinitely more and faster than they ever thought possible. Those that do not, that's their business, but it doesn't change the facts. They can do it the hard way if that's the way they want it... and many do.

    Travis's barrels/rifles are not cheap. They will never be cheap, and they aren't suppose to be. You don't get best for cheap. Yet they always have and always will provide exceptional value. If you like your bullet holes appearing where you want them to, they are very valuable indeed.

    You have a choice to make. The hard way, or the easy way. If you like the hard way, keep thinking that your savage isn't stopping you from learning. Yet I'm not going to kick gravel at you if you're laying down in class in May with that savage. If it goes through the entire class without a stoppage, it'll be the first, and I'll congratulate you. I'll continue to help you, regardless of what you have. However, just because you are comfortable in your delusion that it's not holding you back, doesn't mean I'll allow that delusion to comfort those here reading this. My experience stands on its own and there are enough documented examples of the success of those following my advice to not require any more proof.

    The decision is, forevermore, yours.



  • @orkan Well when you put it that way...seriously man, thank you for your advise. I see your points and the way you put it "You can not discover if you are a 1/4moa shooter with a 1moa rifle" makes complete sense.

    Yeah, please, don't kick gravel at me for shooting a Savage, that is what I'll have in May. It hasn't crapped out at the matches yet, even when shooting 100rnds, so hopefully it won't crap out in May.

    It's not that I am content in a delusion about my gun holding me back, it was simply an assumption based on my very limited experience. The only time I've ever shot a great rifle was when my shooting buddy let me shoot his DTA, but that was only 2 shots, that's it. So for me my cheap Savage 12 LRP & LRH feel great, 'cuz before that I only shot hunting rifles, and hand me downs at that. So I have no clue what a custom gun shoots like or feels like to shoot. I hear about "buttery smooth" actions, but I've never played with such a rifle, so I can't tell you what "buttery smooth" feels like. I do really appreciate you taking the time to respond, and teach, and share...that is why I am here, to learn. I don't know what kind of shooter I am, but I am definitely sure I am years away from being 1/4moa shooter. Unfortunately, and unless I start kicking ass in the real estate venture I am working on soon, my current financial situation will probably only allow me to start saving towards a custom gun in the future.



  • @ramirojpc said:

    don't know what kind of shooter I am, but I am definitely sure I am years away from being 1/4moa shooter.

    Everyone says that. Ask @dddoo7. He said it too. ;) Bought what I suggested, and all of a sudden he's showing us 1/4moa groups. When you have the right equipment, developing the skillset to shoot tight groups is easier than you'd think.

    Making that one single shot in the field count, that's where the fun lives. That's where the challenge is.



  • I will bet that I have less experience with precision shooting than most anyone here. i am still learning how to shoot...but I feel like I am doing so at a very rapid pace.

    I didn't really start shooting seriously until I started the daily shooting about 10 months ago. Shooting every day made it where I was quickly not happy with some of my equipment and made me appreciate other parts of my equipment. I now feel like I have a pretty good set up as far as equipment goes. There are still a few pieces I need to eventually upgrade...but not the rifles or optics. At this point in time I know that if a round doesn't land where I want it to it is my fault in one way or another. Either I didn't read the environmental conditions right...or I didn't hold the gun right...or I made a mistake in reloading...or the barrel was dirty ( :) oops). When shooting rifles like these I can begin to see what I am doing that influences the shot placement and precision/accuracy. Just a few days ago I shot my 40x without a rear bag...and wondered why it was hitting 5/8" high. With my cz455 5/8" high would have been blamed on the rifle. A few weeks ago my DTA was shooting 1" groups. with my R700 it would have been blamed on the rifle. Yet when I know the rifle can shoot sub 1/4"...only then can I know that something I did made the group larger. I have shot many sub 1/4" groups with my DTA in the last year....and again...I am not an experienced precision shooter.

    I even have friends lay down behind my rifle that are not familiar with shooting at all and they will do amazingly well. When you are there in May I will let you shoot the DTA some...and I will bet you are a 1/4 moa shooter.

    Now...getting first round hits in the field I am still working on. I did shoot a starling at 70 yards today with my .22...and shot one earlier this week at 93 yards. They are getting pretty small at that distance due to wind...even with a precision .22.



  • @dddoo7 said:

    i am still learning how to shoot.

    Me too. :)



  • @dddoo7 said:

    When you are there in May I will let you shoot the DTA some...and I will bet you are a 1/4 moa shooter.

    That is a mighty offer man, I really appreciate it.



  • @orkan said:

    @dddoo7 said:

    i am still learning how to shoot.

    Me too. :)

    The day you stop learning is the day you stop trying.



  • @orkan said:

    @ramirojpc said:

    don't know what kind of shooter I am, but I am definitely sure I am years away from being 1/4moa shooter.

    Everyone says that. Ask @dddoo7. He said it too. ;) Bought what I suggested, and all of a sudden he's showing us 1/4moa groups. When you have the right equipment, developing the skillset to shoot tight groups is easier than you'd think.

    The more I think about what you say, the more I am convinced that your suggestions are the way to go. I had originally thought of "graduating" from my Savage to the Shilen DGR barreled action and build from there. But I am going to save up and then hit you up for advise on what to get.

    Making that one single shot in the field count, that's where the fun lives. That's where the challenge is.

    This is the biggest reason I got into the shooting matches I try to go to every month, to become a better shooter. Even though I have fallen in love with precision shooting, I am a hunter first, and having the gear necessary to make 1-shot ethical kills at distance, is where it's at for me.



  • @ramirojpc I have a savage .22lr. Love it to pieces & was at one point convinced it was all I ever needed. I started shooting the dot drill frequently & quickly became frustrated because I'd get flyers despite thinking I had good form. I let my rifle deceive me into believing it was me & not the rifle, as I didn't think I had good enough form yet. After months of frustration, I finally swallowed my pride & asked Orkan if I could shoot his 40x. Despite it being a RH gun & me being a lefty, and the one I chose was a single shot (complete awkwardness for me as a lefty)... I was able to clear the dot drill my first time. No fliers, no deception. The wind tried to get me once, but I still managed to get the edge of that dot! I couldn't stop talking about it for days, I was so excited and relieved :)

    Now I don't have much experience shooting anything but a .22lr but I know for a fact you can't become a good shooter with improper equipment. I'd start saving those pennies & make the investment :) you'll be very happy you did!

    "A woman trying to function like a man is as ridiculous as a man trying to be like a woman. A unisex society is a senseless society—a society dangerously out of order. " - DP

    1


  • @ramirojpc said:

    I am going to save up and then hit you up for advise on what to get.

    Smart man. If you're really going to stick with this, and it isn't just a passing fancy, get yourself about $10,000 squirreled away. Having liquid capital around is a good thing. Paying yourself interest instead of the bank, is a good thing. YOUR money, for YOUR rifle and accessories. Who cares if it takes you 10 years to save it? At the end of it, you'll be able to buy any reasonable rifle, with any optic, setup any way you want, and it will be with you for the rest of your life. Granted you can get a good rifle package setup for far less money, but you don't get to be as choosy.

    In the mean time, shoot what you have. Avoid impulse purchasing. Take a hard look at yourself and decide what's really important to you. Look hard at where your money is being spent. Trim the fat. Find ways of making more money. It's not hard when you try.



  • @orkan said:

    @ramirojpc said:

    I am going to save up and then hit you up for advise on what to get.

    Smart man. If you're really going to stick with this, and it isn't just a passing fancy, get yourself about $10,000 squirreled away.

    This is great because this gives me a target to shoot for (pun totally intended :laughing: )

    In the mean time, shoot what you have. Avoid impulse purchasing. Take a hard look at yourself and decide what's really important to you. Look hard at where your money is being spent. Trim the fat. Find ways of making more money. It's not hard when you try.

    Exactly my plan. I'll keep shooting my Savage and do the best I can with it and learn as much as I can with it, re-barrel it when needed, and keep on saving towards that $10K goal.

    Something I did this morning was to list my daughter's Marlin XT22 for sale on armslist. She had told me about 1 month ago that she wants to get into shooting matches and there's a 22lr match nearby, so I listed that thing and I am planning on getting her a CZ 455. It's about the only gun expense I am planning until I can give Greg a call to help me get setup with my new rig.

    Thanks again for all the tips, advise, and encouragement.



  • @gash So when are you getting your own 40x? lol



  • @norcal_in_az sadly never :( only because I'm a left eye dominant shooter & I shoot left handed. I know Orkan is looking around for a nifty LH .22lr & when the right one comes along I'll get an upgrade :)

    Not too worried about it right now as my savage kills vermin & rodents in the yard easily & that's all I need for now ;)

    "A woman trying to function like a man is as ridiculous as a man trying to be like a woman. A unisex society is a senseless society—a society dangerously out of order. " - DP

    2


  • @gash said:

    as my savage kills vermin & rodents in the yard easily

    That ain't no kidding either, because when I want to sit out and whack vermin... they're all dead from her knocking their brains out all day while I'm gone. lol.



  • @gash said:

    @norcal_in_az sadly never :( only because I'm a left eye dominant shooter & I shoot left handed. I know Orkan is looking around for a nifty LH .22lr & when the right one comes along I'll get an upgrade :)

    Not too worried about it right now as my savage kills vermin & rodents in the yard easily & that's all I need for now ;)

    Shoot, with the combined talent of Orkan and Travis I would think they would design and make a "1 off" custom lefty for you!!!

    99% of the Lawyers make the rest look bad.

    0

Log in to reply